Give the value of your marketing a quantum leap

If you have 16 minutes, here’s a short presentation I delivered the other night. The premise is that we are missing the point of our marketing: yes, we generate a return and revenue today, but the greatest value is the future value that we are able to generate by studying the information our marketing generates.

Did you know that if you bought Apple today at full price ($311 billion), you wouldn’t make your first penny of return for 14 years* (see below if you’re a super finance nerd)? Future value is a big deal, and we have the type of information that can generate tremendous future value for our companies. Are we using it? Not really.

Lastly, we talk about how to make your marketing and its reporting and insight more closely reflect your business, rather than just spitting out data, based on the core ideas around information architecture (see this post for more on that).

Try to ignore the first little bit on social, that’s not what this is about at all.

Evan LaPointe – the true value of your marketing from Evan LaPointe on Vimeo.

Leave some comments! What sticks out to you? How do you put this idea to use in your business?

* This is a way overly simplified model of valuation, not counting discounted cash flow or time value, which would actually extend the return horizon significantly. For the purpose of the presentation, the example is simplified, so don’t tell me how it’s not proper valuation 🙂 That’s not the point!


No Trackbacks

One Comment

  1. Enjoyed the video. Social media is a pretty fascinating beast. I liked how you broke out the charts to display how people browse the site – very easy to digest. It seems so many people get hung up on making micro-optimizations (including me). With something like Facebook, optimizing your page’s message becomes more and more important (and much more important early in the game). It’s really the only platform where you have to learn your audience fast and re-purpose it faster; because once you have lost the interest of your audience, they can still be a fan and block you out of their communication circle. Even when you establish HOW some people use the site – it’s difficult to estimate the value of that information because you are more likely to get a larger sample of people who are dissatisfied with the content than those who are satisfied… and STILL you have to figure out where you draw the line between having a simple targeted page and one that answers everyone’s question (which depending on how it’s designed, can raise even more questions!). Yep… a pretty fascinating beast, indeed.

    Posted February 2, 2011 at 8:43 pm | Permalink